What is it about International Programs School that is unlike any other school I’ve work in?

Mr. Bill Cooke

By Mr. Bill Cooke

Students here are involved learners.  Students enthusiastically ask questions. As we spend more time together, students evolve from stating, “I don’t understand!” They ask, “Will you please help me to understand?”

I recently challenged a group of students who were hosting a career fair for other high school and middle school students to sell the career they were thinking about pursuing.  They did.  One graduating senior asked me, “Do you want to hear my presentation?”  How, as an educator could I say, “No?”  Of course I listened as the student interjected passion into his thoughtful electrical engineering career choice.  I overheard another student as the same question of another one of his teachers.  That teacher listened as well. The two illustrations are indicative of IPS students.

IPS students want to be involved in their learning activities; they want to interact with their teachers.  They want to impress their teachers.  Students appreciate it when teachers take the time to model behaviors that will benefit them, both in learning and social environments. Yes, vacation trips to many places around the world—or even one particular place if you are like me—make international education a nice career.  But I find the combination of my love of teaching and International Programs School the most rewarding experience of my nearly 30-year profession as an educator.